Analytical articles

THE AFGHANISTAN PAPERS:  A secret history of the war — Part 2

STRANDED WITHOUT A STRATEGY Bush and Obama had polar-opposite plans to win the war. By Craig Whitlock Dec. 9, 2019 The Washington Post    PAKISTAN BORDER, 2009 (Chris Hondros/Getty Images) MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, TAMPA, 2002 (Christopher Morris/VII/Redux)   ARLINGTON CEMETERY, SECTION 60, 2014 (Amanda Voisard for The Post) In the beginning, the rationale for invading Afghanistan was

Analysis: Taliban continues to lie about presence of foreign fighters in Afghanistan

BY THOMAS JOSCELYN AND CALEB WEISS December 6, 2019 The Long War Journal Earlier this year, Abdul Haq, the head of the Turkistan Islamic Party, called on Taliban and al-Qaeda leaders and ideologues to offer more rhetorical support for the Uighurs’ cause. On Dec. 4, FDD’s Long War Journal reported on a new video released by the Turkistan Islamic Party (TIP),

Afghanistan’s 2019 Elections (26): A Q&A about the ongoing election stalemate

Author: Ali Yawar Adili Afghanistan Analysts Network Date: 8 December 2019 Election protest in Kabul on 29 November 2019. Source: Dr Abdullah’s Facebook page The aftermath of Afghanistan’s 2019 presidential election has now dragged on for 72 days. The Independent Election Commission (IEC) has missed two dates for the announcement of preliminary results and is 50 days behind

Insurgent Bureaucracy: How the Taliban Makes Policy

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 BY: Ashley Jackson; Rahmatullah Amiri United States Institute of Peace The system of shadow Taliban governance and the experiences of civilians subject to it are well documented. The policies that guide this governance and the factors that contribute to them, however, are not. This report examines how the Taliban make and implement

USIP reports: Insurgent Bureaucracy: How the Taliban Makes Policy

BY: Ashley Jackson and Rahmatullah Amiri US Institute of Peace Tuesday, November 19, 2019 The system of shadow Taliban governance and the experiences of civilians subject to it are well documented. The policies that guide this governance and the factors that contribute to them, however, are not. This report examines how the Taliban make and

Afghanistan at a Crossroads

Posted November 21, 2019 by Arne Strand and Kristian Berg Harpviken Prio blogs Oslo, Norway Can the conflict in Afghanistan be resolved politically, or must the war continue until one of the parties has won? The conflict in Afghanistan is now the world’s deadliest. The United States and the Taliban negotiated a peace agreement that never got signed. The recent exchange

Trump was right to abandon the Taliban peace deal. Here’s what a good one would look like.

By David H. Petraeus and Vance Serchuk  November 14, 2019 at 10:36 a.m. EST The Washington Post David H. Petraeus is a former director of the CIA, former commander of U.S. Central Command and chairman of KKR Global Institute, where Vance Serchuk, an adjunct senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, is executive director. An Afghan

What the United States Gets Wrong About Peace Talks

Even when the country wants a deal, at least four largely psychological impediments get in the way. BY JOHNNY WALSH United States Institute of Peace OCTOBER 18, 2019, 9:29 AM Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaks as U.S. President Donald Trump listens before a meeting at the Palace Hotel during the 72nd United Nations General Assembly in

CIA-backed Afghan paramilitaries accused of grave abuses: new Human Rights Watch report

Author: Kate Clark Afghanistan Analysts Network Date: 31 October 2019 Part of the compound of Naim Faruki, who was killed on 30 December 2018 in Zurmat, Paktia, allegedly by the Khost Protection Force. His brother described how, before the strike force entered, the compound wall was detonated by a bomb or a rocket – the family

Afghanistan is much more important to US than Syria – Afghans need American troops

OPINION By James Jay Carafano Fox News 25 October 2019 While the world worries about U.S. policy in Syria, it would be wise pay at least as much attention to what happens in Afghanistan. It’s even more important that the Trump administration gets its policy exactly right there. The U.S. reportedly has begun, quietly, to reduce its military

Analytical articles