A Radical Cleric Ignites an Islamist Resistance in Afghanistan

By David Zucchino and Najim Rahim Photographs by Jim Huylebroek The New York Times Oct. 23, 2020 The cleric’s supporters in Herat are enforcing harsh Shariah law reminiscent of the Taliban’s. Women are alarmed, and the government has been able to do little. Friday prayer at cleric Mawlawi Mujib Rahman Ansari’s mosque in Herat, Afghanistan, last month. HERAT, Afghanistan

October 23, 2020

Our secret Taliban air force

Wesley Morgan The Washington Post 22 October 2020 Wesley Morgan has reported on the U.S. military and its wars since 2007. He is the author of the forthcoming book “The Hardest Place: The American Military Adrift in Afghanistan’s Pech Valley.” Inside the clandestine U.S. campaign to help our longtime enemy defeat ISIS Tyler Comrie photo illustration

October 22, 2020

$19 billion in aid to Afghanistan lost to corruption: SIGAR

Afghanistan Times 21 October 2020  KABUL: Billions of dollars in U.S. foreign aid to Afghanistan has been lost to widespread waste, and endemic corruption in the past 10 years, the US oversight authority on Afghanistan reconstruction says. The US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan, SIGAR, in a new report said that more than $19 billion

October 22, 2020

Support peace in Afghanistan

Is peace at hand?

The February agreement between the United States and the Taliban started the clock running for the withdrawal of all U.S. combat troops. The Pentagon announced in June that the first 5,000 troops had been withdrawn ahead of the July deadline, in spite of increased Taliban attacks on Afghan government forces. By the time of the U.S. presidential election, the total number of U.S. troops will be reduced to about 4,000, with the balance scheduled to be withdrawn by April 2021.

The Afghan government seems to be in denial, apparently convinced that the Americans will not withdraw all troops and reduce financial support. President Trump is not the first American president to announce he is leaving, but this time is different. President Trump wants to fulfill a campaign promise and, facing dealing a dire economic collapse, the United States can no longer afford to spend tens-of-billions of dollars a year on a war that was lost long ago. Moreover, Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential candidate, has long been a critic of the war and is on record promising to withdraw all combat troops in his first year in office should he be elected president.

The Afghan government is urging the United States to keep troops in Afghanistan until the Taliban agree to a long-term ceasefire and reach an agreement with the government for a political settlement of the war. This is a formula for an open-ended troop commitment.

Is peace at hand?

The February agreement between the United States and the Taliban started the clock running for the withdrawal of all U.S. combat troops. The Pentagon announced in June that the first 5,000 troops had been withdrawn ahead of the July deadline, in spite of increased Taliban attacks on Afghan government forces. The Trump administration agreed to withdraw the remaining 8,600 U.S. troops by April 2021, but there are indications that the president wants all troops out by the November U.S. elections.

The Afghan government is in denial, apparently convinced that the Americans will not withdraw all troops and cut financial support. President Trump is not the first American president to announce he is leaving, but this time is different. President Trump wants to fulfill a campaign promise and, facing dealing a dire economic collapse, the United States can no longer afford to spend tens-of-billions of dollars a year on a war that was lost long ago. Moreover, Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic presidential candidate, has long been a critic of the war and is on record promising to withdraw all combat troops in his first year in office should he be elected president.

The Afghan government is urging the United States to keep troops in Afghanistan until the Taliban agree to a long-term ceasefire and reach an agreement with the government for a political settlement of the war. This is a formula for an open-ended troop commitment.

What we do


• Work with U.S. and European peace and humanitarian aid organizations
• Provide information to executive branch officials and congressional staff
• Organize meetings in the U.S. and lead fact-finding trips to Afghanistan
• Write op-ed articles, meet with reporters and do television interviews

Learn more

To learn more, here are some organizations working to promote peace, respect for human rights and economic development in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan Analysts Network

Kabul-based resource on Afghan politics

United States Institute of Peace

Analysis of peace efforts in Afghanistan

International Crisis Group

Analysis of the Afghan war and U.S. policy

Win Without War

America’s largest anti-war coalition

Center for International Policy

Independent research and analysis

Institute for Policy Studies

Center of anti-war advocacy and activism

Mercy Corps International

Aid and peace building programs in Afghanistan

Articles

Contact us

Afghanistan Peace Campaign

P.O. Box 21375

Washington, DC 20009

info@afghanistanpeacecampaign.org 

501(c)(3) fiscal sponsorship for Afghanistan Peace Campaign provided by:

Social Good Fund

12651 San Pablo Ave, Richmond, CA 94805

Home Page