January 17, 2022 1:54 PM EST Last Updated an hour ago Environment Magnitude 5.6 quake hits western Afghanistan, killing more than 20 Reuters 1 minute read KABUL, Jan 17 (Reuters) – An earthquake rocked western Afghanistan on Monday, killing more than 20 people and destroying hundreds of homes, local authorities said. The 5.6 magnitude tremor shook the western province of Badghis, bordering Turkmenistan, in the afternoon, reducing brick homes to rubble, according to photos shared by local authorities. “Unfortunately, our initial reports show that 22 people, including women and children, have been killed and four others injured,” said Baz Mohammad Sarwari, the director of Information and Culture of the Badghis provincial administration. Report ad “The Mujahideen have reached to some of the affected areas, but Badghis is a mountainous province, the number of casualties might go up,” he added, referring to Taliban fighters, and adding that heavy rain was also lashing the area. Mullah Janan Saeqe, head of the Emergency Operations Centre of the Ministry of State for Emergency Affairs, confirmed the death toll and said more than 700 houses had been damaged. Report ad Sanullah Sabit, the head of the nursing unit at the main hospital in Badghis’ capital said they had received five patients injured in the quake, mostly with broken bones and fractures. The quake was at a depth of 30 km (18.64 miles), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre Reporting by Kabul newsroom and Sneha Bhowmik in Bengaluru; Writing by Charlotte Greenfield; Editing by Louise Heavens, William Maclean

KABUL, Jan 17 (Reuters) – An earthquake rocked western Afghanistan on Monday, killing more than 20 people and destroying hundreds of homes, local authorities said.

The 5.6 magnitude tremor shook the western province of Badghis, bordering Turkmenistan, in the afternoon, reducing brick homes to rubble, according to photos shared by local authorities.

“Unfortunately, our initial reports show that 22 people, including women and children, have been killed and four others injured,” said Baz Mohammad Sarwari, the director of Information and Culture of the Badghis provincial administration.

“The Mujahideen have reached to some of the affected areas, but Badghis is a mountainous province, the number of casualties might go up,” he added, referring to Taliban fighters, and adding that heavy rain was also lashing the area.

Mullah Janan Saeqe, head of the Emergency Operations Centre of the Ministry of State for Emergency Affairs, confirmed the death toll and said more than 700 houses had been damaged.

Sanullah Sabit, the head of the nursing unit at the main hospital in Badghis’ capital said they had received five patients injured in the quake, mostly with broken bones and fractures.

The quake was at a depth of 30 km (18.64 miles), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre

Reporting by Kabul newsroom and Sneha Bhowmik in Bengaluru; Writing by Charlotte Greenfield; Editing by Louise Heavens, William Maclean
January 17, 2022 1:54 PM EST Last Updated an hour ago Environment Magnitude 5.6 quake hits western Afghanistan, killing more than 20 Reuters 1 minute read KABUL, Jan 17 (Reuters) – An earthquake rocked western Afghanistan on Monday, killing more than 20 people and destroying hundreds of homes, local authorities said. The 5.6 magnitude tremor shook the western province of Badghis, bordering Turkmenistan, in the afternoon, reducing brick homes to rubble, according to photos shared by local authorities. “Unfortunately, our initial reports show that 22 people, including women and children, have been killed and four others injured,” said Baz Mohammad Sarwari, the director of Information and Culture of the Badghis provincial administration. Report ad “The Mujahideen have reached to some of the affected areas, but Badghis is a mountainous province, the number of casualties might go up,” he added, referring to Taliban fighters, and adding that heavy rain was also lashing the area. Mullah Janan Saeqe, head of the Emergency Operations Centre of the Ministry of State for Emergency Affairs, confirmed the death toll and said more than 700 houses had been damaged. Report ad Sanullah Sabit, the head of the nursing unit at the main hospital in Badghis’ capital said they had received five patients injured in the quake, mostly with broken bones and fractures. The quake was at a depth of 30 km (18.64 miles), according to the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre Reporting by Kabul newsroom and Sneha Bhowmik in Bengaluru; Writing by Charlotte Greenfield; Editing by Louise Heavens, William Maclean
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Islamic Emirate Deploys Around 2,500 Troops to Sar-e-Pul

17 Jan 2022

The commander denied reports about the presence of Daesh fighters in the province and warned that they would prevent any attacks. 

The Islamic Emirate deployed more than 2,500 troops to the northern province of Sar-e-Pul to provide security there.  

“Over 1,500 Mujahedeen are settled in Squadron-3 and over 1,000 others stationed in Squadron-4. Now, also 200 Mujahedeen have graduated after taking six weeks of training,” said Mufti Mohammad Muqtasid, a senior commander of the Islamic Emirate in the province.

The commander of the Al-Fatha corps in northern Afghanistan, Ataullah Omari, said that the newly deployed forces are professionally trained.

The commander denied reports about the presence of Daesh fighters in the province and warned that they would prevent any attacks.

The commander praised the sacrifice of Islamic Emirate forces, saying it was the main factor in defeating the US in Afghanistan.

“The US with all of its selfishness and equipment and funds was defeated. They left our country in shame and embarrassment,” he said.

The Al-Fatha corpse is in charge of ensuring security in Faryab, Sar-e-Pul, Jawzjan, Balkh and Samangan provinces.

The process of training new forces is ongoing, the commander said.

Previously, the chief of staff of the Islamic Emirate forces announced that efforts were underway to form a unit of 100,000 troops.

Islamic Emirate Deploys Around 2,500 Troops to Sar-e-Pul
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UN: Islamic Emirate Trying to ‘Erase’ Women From Public Life

The Islamic Emirate denies it has imposed any kind of restriction on women’s activities.

A group of UN human rights experts warned on Monday against attempts to “steadily erase women and girls from public life,” the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights said in a recent statement. 

The experts said that large-scale and systematic gender-based discrimination and violence against women and girls has been ongoing since the fall of the former government. “Taken together, these policies constitute a collective punishment of women and girls, grounded on gender-based bias and harmful practices,” the experts said. “Today, we are witnessing the attempt to steadily erase women and girls from public life in Afghanistan including in institutions and mechanisms that had been previously set up to assist and protect those women and girls who are most at risk.”

According to the experts, women and girls in Afghanistan are being pushed out of public life. “We are concerned about the continuous and systematic efforts to exclude women from the social, economic, and political spheres across the country.”

The Islamic Emirate denied that it has imposed any type of restrictions on women and said that women are continuing to work in government departments.

“No restrictions are imposed on women. Women are working in government departments. The plan to include women in the formation of the new government is under discussion,” said Ahmadullah Wasiq, deputy spokesman for the Islamic Emirate.

The human rights experts said these concerns are exacerbated in the cases of women from ethnic, religious, or linguistic minorities. The experts have also raised concerns over the risk of exploitation of women and girls including trafficking for the purposes of child and forced marriage, sexual exploitation and forced labor.

Some Afghan women’s rights activists said that the challenges for women have been rising since the Islamic Emirate swept into power.

“Women are struggling with challenges in a variety of ways since the Taliban has come into power,” said Tamana Zaryab, a women rights activist.

According to the experts, barring women from returning to their jobs, requiring a male relative to accompany them in public spaces, prohibiting women from using public transportations on their own, and denying secondary and tertiary education for girls are the policies being implemented for the exclusion of women. “In addition to severely limiting their freedom of movement, expression and association, and their participation in public and political affairs, these policies have also affected the ability of women to work and to make a living, pushing them further into poverty,” the experts said.

The experts also called on the international community to step up the needed humanitarian assistance for the people of Afghanistan to prevent further deterioration of the situation in the country. According to the experts, the humanitarian crisis in the country has been more devastating for women, children, minorities and female-headed households.

The experts have also called on the international community to hold the Islamic Emirate accountable and also to observe human rights and immediately remove restrictions on women and girls’ fundamental rights.

UN: Islamic Emirate Trying to ‘Erase’ Women From Public Life
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Cost for Afghan Refugees at Bases Reaches $688 Million, Pentagon Says

By Travis Tritten

Military.com

13 Jan 2022|
Afghan evacuees embrace before they board a bus and depart
Afghan evacuees embrace before they board a bus and depart for the airport, January 10, 2022. The evacuees are leaving Fort Pickett on their way to resettle in various cities across the United States. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist John Pearl)

The military’s total cost for housing tens of thousands of Afghan refugees at U.S. bases has already topped $688 million, according to the Defense Department.

The most recent figure accounts for refugee villages set up at eight bases from August through mid-December, the department told Military.com on Wednesday. The cost is certain to rise as about 19,500 Afghans remain on installations awaiting permanent resettlement.

More than 76,000 refugees arrived in the U.S. as part of Operation Allies Welcome when Kabul fell to the Taliban and the military ended its 20-year campaign in war-torn Afghanistan. Many of the refugees worked with U.S. forces, and the U.S. military undertook one of the largest airlifts in history to bring them to safety.

The cost is a drop in the bucket compared to this year’s $741 billion budget for defense. Congress has already passed $13.3 billion in funding for the resettlement effort, which supports the Pentagon as well as the Department of Homeland Security, State Department, and Department of Health and Human Services.

But the military services are also dealing with an oncoming budget crisis. Congress has yet to agree on spending legislation for the current fiscal year, which began in September, and may punt on funding the entire rest of the year after a series of stopgap measures divided Democrats and Republicans.

The budget stalemate must be worked out by next month, when the current short-term funding expires.

The cost has also riled some Republicans in Congress. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., opposed the approved funding, saying it was more than the entire budget of his home state, which has over 4 million residents.

Afghans remain at five U.S. bases. The number reported by DHS at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, is 9,700; Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, 4,400; Fort Pickett, Virginia, 2,700; Camp Atterbury, Indiana, 1,100; and Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, 1,600.

Meanwhile, three bases have wrapped up missions housing the Afghan men, women and children. Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia housed and helped resettle 3,755 Afghans.

The Marine base created housing at an old officer candidate school and built tent facilities, provided three daily meals, internet services and educational classes. The effort was managed by 924 DoD personnel, according to an inspector general report.

The total cost for Quantico was $188 million, the IG found. The DoD watchdog is conducting a series of audits on the resettlement program.

Cost for Afghan Refugees at Bases Reaches $688 Million, Pentagon Says
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‘We are struggling’: two former officials at Afghan women’s affairs ministry

The Guardian interview
16 Jan 2022
Illustration for Afghanistan Left Behind series
Activists Gul Bano and Karima are in hiding. Illustration: Guardian Design

Gul Bano and Karima’s former offices are in the hands of the Taliban – and they fear for their lives

Gul Bano* and Karima* are activists who ran provincial branches of the ministry of women’s affairs in two different parts of Afghanistan. Their former offices have been taken over by the Taliban’s feared enforcers, the ministry for the promotion of virtue and prevention of vice. They are now in hiding, afraid of the men they helped put in prison for domestic violence and other abuses, many of them in the Taliban or with family links to the militants.

Karima

I know at least four women activists or government workers who have been killed in the last four months, and one who was kidnapped and it is not clear what happened to her.

I moved from my province to a bigger city in July, but the security situation there was also bad so I set off for Kabul, planning to get my passport and leave the country. Unfortunately my family and the Taliban arrived in Kabul on the same day, and we are still waiting for the passports.

I advocated for women for the past 15 years, that’s why Taliban are looking for me. I supported women who were victims of violence, and I was threatened for that even under the last government. Six women from our office were killed in recent years.

In the first few days of Taliban rule I got so many calls, asking where is this woman and that woman you supported, what is their address?

Women we were supporting and helping to escape from violent situations were mostly from very remote regions and villages under Taliban control, so their relatives were Taliban. And these were some of the people calling me and threatening me.

Many of the abusers had been imprisoned because of our work for women’s rights, then the Taliban took over and released all the prisoners, and now most of the threats are coming from these abusers. According to their point of view I am not even a Muslim because I was advocating for women’s rights.

I don’t feel safe here. We change where we are staying every week and I have told even my very close relatives that we left Afghanistan already. We are in a crisis as we have no salary to pay rent, – in addition to fears about the Taliban, we also have to worry about cold and hunger.

We applied for asylum everywhere we could think of, including the UK, and received no news, so I am here with my husband and children, waiting and sitting. I am sure I won’t be able to remain in Afghanistan. Even if I don’t get support, I will smuggle myself to Iran, Tajikistan or Pakistan.

Gul Bano

I’ve been living in fear and shock since the fall of Kabul. We held a women’s protest and they tried to attack and stop us. So now I’m in hiding and always under direct threat due to my job as a women’s rights activist and a [former] government employee.

I’ve been receiving threatening calls on a daily basis, not only from the Taliban but also from relatives and family members of those women I tried to defend. They tell me: “We are following you, we see you but you don’t see us.”

Even under the previous government there were several attempts against my life by these men, which fortunately I escaped unharmed

I fled my home when the Taliban took over and they seized it, looted all my possessions and took all of my documents. It is in a very good neighbourhood, and now one of the most senior Taliban officials in the province lives there, which breaks my heart.

I was defending women’s rights in that house and the Taliban are living there now. It hurts me, and I’m facing real mental health challenges now.

It’s not only me. We, the heads of the ministry of women’s affairs offices in 34 provinces, are struggling. The Taliban are trying to track us down and we only try to keep ourselves safe by changing where we stay.

I ask anyone out there in the world who can do something: help Afghan women and get us out of this humiliation. I have so far requested several countries for help but received no positive response, even though they announced that they’ll help Afghan women who are in danger.

All I got is an email from the US state department saying they can only help those who were their employees and that they are sorry.

*Names have been changed for this article.

‘We are struggling’: two former officials at Afghan women’s affairs ministry
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Taliban forces pepper-spray women’s rights protesters in Kabul

Agence France-Presse in Kabul

One woman reportedly taken to hospital after protest calling for right to work and education is stopped

Women's rights protesters in Kabul
Women’s rights protesters in Kabul on Sunday. Photograph: Wakil Kohsar/AFP/Getty Images

Taliban forces have fired pepper spray at a group of women protesting in Afghanistan’s capital to demand rights to work and education.

Since seizing control of the country by force in August, the Taliban authorities have imposed creeping restrictions on Afghans, especially on women.

About 20 women gathered in front of Kabul University on Sunday, chanting “equality and justice” and carrying banners that read “women’s rights, human rights”, an AFP correspondent reported.

The protest was later dispersed by the Taliban fighters, who arrived at the scene in several vehicles, three of the protesters told AFP.

“When we were near Kabul University three Taliban vehicles came, and fighters from one of the vehicles used pepper spray on us,” said one woman, who asked not to be named for security reasons. “My right eye started to burn. I told one of them: ‘Shame on you,’ and then he pointed his gun at me.”

Two other protesters said that one of the women had to be taken to hospital after the spray caused an allergic reaction in her eyes and face.

An AFP correspondent saw a fighter confiscate a mobile phone from a man who was filming the demonstration.

The hardline Islamist group have banned unsanctioned protests and have frequently intervened to forcefully break up rallies demanding rights for women.

The Taliban authorities have blocked female public sector employees from returning to work, many secondary schools have still not reopened for girls and public universities are shut. Long-distance trips for women who are not accompanied by a close male relative have been banned.

The authorities have also issued guidelines that prevent television channels from broadcasting serials featuring female actors.

Many women are living in hiding, fearful of a regime notorious for human rights abuses during the Taliban’s first stint in power between 1996 and 2001.

Taliban forces pepper-spray women’s rights protesters in Kabul
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The AP Interview: Taliban pledge all girls in schools soon

By KATHY GANNON

Associated Press

15 Jan 2022
Taliban government spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Jan. 15, 2022. Afghanistan's Taliban rulers are aiming to restart education for girls and women by late March, the government's chief spokesman told The Associated Press in an interview,  offering the first-ever timeline for addressing a key demand of the international community. (AP Photo/Mohammed Shoaib Amin).
Taliban government spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Jan. 15, 2022. Afghanistan’s Taliban rulers are aiming to restart education for girls and women by late March, the government’s chief spokesman told The Associated Press in an interview, offering the first-ever timeline for addressing a key demand of the international community. (AP Photo/Mohammed Shoaib Amin).

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan’s new Taliban rulers say they hope to be able to open all schools for girls across the country after late March, their spokesman told The Associated Press on Saturday, offering the first timeline for addressing a key demand of the international community.

Since the Taliban takeover in mid-August, girls in most of Afghanistan have not been allowed back to school beyond grade 7. The international community, reluctant to formally recognize a Taliban-run administration, is wary they could impose similar harsh measures as during their previous rule 20 years ago. At the time, women were banned from education, work and public life.

Zabihullah Mujahid, who is also the Taliban’s deputy minister of culture and information, said their education departments are looking to open classrooms for all girls and women following the Afghan New Year, which starts on March 21. Afghanistan, like neighboring Iran, observers the Islamic solar Hijri Shamsi calendar.

Education for girls and women “is a question of capacity,” Mujahid said in the interview.

Girls and boys must be completely segregated in schools, he said, adding that the biggest obstacle so far has been finding or building enough dorms, or hostels, where girls could stay while going to school. In heavily populated areas, it is not enough to have separate classrooms for boys and girls — separate school buildings are needed, he said.

“We are not against education,” Mujahid stressed, speaking at a Kabul office building with marble floors that once housed Afghan attorney general’s offices and which the Taliban have adopted for their culture and information ministry.

The Taliban dictates so far have been erratic, varying from province to province. Girls have not been allowed back to classrooms in state-run schools beyond grade 7, except in about 10 of the country’s 34 provinces. In the capital, Kabul, private universities and high schools have continued to operate uninterrupted. Most are small and the classes have always been segregated.

“We are trying to solve these problems by the coming year,” so that schools and universities can open, Mujahid said.

The international community has been skeptical of Taliban announcements, saying it will judge them by their actions — even as it scrambles to provide billions of dollars to avert a humanitarian catastrophe that the U.N. chief this week warned could endanger the lives of millions.

With a breakdown of services and only sporadic electricity in the bitterly cold Afghan winters, most people rely on firewood and coal for heat. Among the hardest hit are some 3 million Afghans who live as refugees within their own country, having fled their homes because of war, drought, poverty or fear of the Taliban.

Earlier this month, the United Nations launched a $5 billion appeal for Afghanistan, the single largest appeal for one country.

Washington has spent $145 billion on reconstruction and development projects in Afghanistan since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion that ousted the Taliban regime. Yet even before the Taliban recaptured the country, the poverty rate was 54% —and a 2018 Gallup poll revealed unprecedented misery among Afghans.

Mujahid appealed for economic cooperation, trade and “stronger diplomatic relations.” So far, neither Afghanistan’s neighbors nor the United Nations seem ready to grant formal recognition which would help open up the Afghan economy. However U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres has called for greater economic development, saying it’s critical to rapidly inject liquidity into the Afghan economy “and avoid a meltdown that would lead to poverty, hunger and destitution for millions.”

The international community has called for a more representative government that includes women as well as ethnic and religious minorities. While all members of the new Taliban Cabinet are men and most are Taliban members, Mujahid said there are exceptions such as the deputy finance minister and officials in the economics ministry who are holdovers from the previous, U.S.-backed administration.

Mujahid also said 80% of civil servants who have returned to work were employees under the previous administration. Women are working in the health and education sector and at Kabul International Airport in customs and passport control, he added. He did not say if or when women would be allowed to return to work in government ministries.

He also told the AP that most of the new government’s revenue will come from customs that the Taliban will collect at border crossings with Iran, Pakistan and the Central Asian nations to the north. Without offering figures, he claimed the Taliban have brought in more revenue in their first four months in power than the previous government in over a year.

He appealed on Afghans who have fled to return to their homeland. Since the takeover, there have been cases of opponents arrested, journalists beaten, rights workers threatened and demonstrations by women dispersed by heavily armed Taliban troops firing in the air.

Mujahid acknowledged incidents of Taliban members harassing Afghan civilians, including humiliating young men and forcibly cutting their hair.

“Such crimes happen, but it is not the policy of our government,” he said, adding that those responsible were arrested.

“This is our message. We have no dispute with anyone and we don’t want anyone to remain in opposition or away from their country.”

Kathy Gannon, Associated Press news director for Afghanistan and Pakistan, has been covering the region for more than 30 years. 

The AP Interview: Taliban pledge all girls in schools soon
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Detained Islamic Emirate Commander Brought to Kabul

Makhdoom Alam, a local commander of the Islamic Emirate who was detained by the government, has been brought to Kabul, officials said. 

Commander Makhdoom Alam, who was based in Faryab province, was arrested last Thursday in Balkh.

The arrest of the commander sparked widespread demonstrations by residents in Maimana, Faryab’s provincial capital.

“The person who was arrested … is still detained by the security forces. The investigation is underway to find out the status of the case,” said Bilal Karimi, deputy spokesman for the Islamic Emirate.

A spokesman for the Islamic Emirate told the BBC that the commander was involved in kidnapping.

“Remove this issue from your mind—to do something by way of demonstrations. The demonstrations are not going to change anything. The demonstration was set up by Westerners. This is what you call democracy,” said the acting Minister of Agriculture Mawlawi Abdul Rahman Rashid.

Officials in Faryab said that the situation has returned to normal in the province.

“We will not allow anyone to cause such unrest in the city,” Faryab Governor Qari Hafizullah said.

Mukhdom is an influential commander of the Islamic Emirate in northern Afghanistan. The Islamic Emirate denied any type of racism in the arrest of the commander.

Detained Islamic Emirate Commander Brought to Kabul
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Girls’ Schools May Open in New Solar Year: Mujahid

Female students said the Islamic Emirate must keep its promises to reopen schools. 

The Islamic Emirate spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said authorities are hoping to be able to reopen all girls’ schools across the country in the new solar year which starts on March 21, and are working toward this.

Talking to the Associated Press on Saturday, Mujahid said the Islamic Emirate is not against education, but boys and girls must be completely segregated in schools.

Since the Islamic Emirate’s takeover in mid-August, girls in most parts of Afghanistan have not been allowed back to school beyond grade 7. The closing of girls’ schools has been met with sharp reactions inside the country as well as from the international community.

According to Mujahid, finding or building enough classrooms for both boys and girls has been one of the main obstacles in the way of reopening girls’ schools. “We are trying to solve these problems by the coming year,” he said.

Meanwhile, a number of female students who remain out of school said the Islamic Emirate should keep its promise and reopen the schools in the new year.

“We have heard a lot of promises but these promises must become practical. We were deprived of going to school due to Covid-19 and then because of recent changes in the country,” said Bahara, a student.

“We are calling for the immediate reopening of schools, and the government should pave the ground for this,” said Azada, a student.

A number of female teachers said they have not received their salaries for five months and they urged the Islamic Emirate to address their challenges.

“We have not been called to schools for the past five months. Even those teachers at boys’ schools face an uncertain fate,” said Suhaila Omar Zada, a teacher.

Schools in Afghanistan were not only disrupted by political change, but also because of the spread of COVID-19.

Girls’ Schools May Open in New Solar Year: Mujahid
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Displaced Families Sell Children, Organs to Survive

These families were helped by a charity committee to stop them from selling the kids and kidneys.  

Displaced families living in a camp in the capital city of Balkh province have sold their children and their kidneys for funds to survive. 

The displaced families escaped heavy conflict between the Islamic Emirate and former government forces before the fall of the republican government in the northern provinces of Balkh, Sar-e-Pul, Faryab and Jawzjan.  

A charity committee is helping displaced families with food and cash aid in order to dissuade them from selling their children and kidneys.  

The price of a child is between 100,000 to 150,000 Afs and the price of one kidney is 150,000 to 220,000 Afs.

The families are living in a camp in Mazar-e-Sharif, the capital of Balkh province.

The families said that they were forced to make such decisions due to poverty, the economic problems in the country as well Covid-19’s outbreak.

“We are overwhelmed with problems. No one pays attention to us. We are in deep trouble,” said a displaced person.

Every family has around two to seven children.

Dilbar is a war-displaced person whose family is struggling with starvation. Dilbar said she had no choice but to sell her kidney to take care of her children.

“I was rescued by my operation. My child was sick. I took her to the hospital for treatment but the doctors told me her treatment would not be done,” she said.

These families were helped by a charity committee to stop them from selling the kids and kidneys.

The charity committee provided cash aid and food for thousands displaced and vulnerable people in Mazar-e-Sharif.

The head of the charity committee, Mohammad Sadiq Hashimi, called on national business people to boost efforts to help the people in need across the country.

“There were some sisters who were ready to sell their kidneys – some of them have already sold their kidneys. I saw some families who were selling their children. We were able to help them,” he said.

The Islamic Ulema and residents of Balkh urged the international community to provide humanitarian assistance to the Afghans as the country is going through a severe humanitarian catastrophe.

Displaced Families Sell Children, Organs to Survive
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